Bike Size

Choosing the right sized bike

Getting the correct size of the bike is very important and if it is your first bike you should pay extra attention to it.
The right sized bike will be safer as well more comfortable, more efficient and more fun to ride.
Even experienced cyclists find it tricky when choosing the right size frame as it depends on many factors like: type of bike, your height and your riding style.
Below you will find general explanation for each bike type. It is only a guide and we recommend visiting your local bicycle store.

Bikes are generally measured and defined by:
· Wheel size (Imperial/inches)
· The length of the seat tube – the part of the bike that the seat post slides into down to the centre of the crank wheel. Traditionally this measurement is given in metric (cm) for road bikes, and imperial/inches for mountain bikes.

 
Junior Bikes:
Children’s bikes are wrongly defined by age, child’s size should be considered.
Options are given as wheel sizes Imperial/inches.
When childrn are still learning to ride, it is very important to choose the right bike size for safety and to avoid deterring the child from riding a bike that might be too small, too big or too heavy. There can be a temptation to stretch the life of a bike by buying a slightly bigger one. This should be avoided as whilst a child is learning they must be able to straddle the top tube safely, feet touching the ground.
Our table below suggest which wheel sizes are most suitable for which age range, however you know your child best. If he / she is the tallest in the class and on the upper limit for a wheel size, we suggest getting the next wheel size up. If he / she is in the middle of the range, we suggest you stick to that size.

 Kids

Age Inside Leg Wheel Size
2-4 yrs 30cm 12" or Beginner Bikes
2-5 yrs 30cm 12"
3-5 yrs 36cm 16"
5-7 yrs 41cm 16"
7-9 yrs 51cm 20"
9-11 yrs 61cm 24"
11 and up 66cm 26"

Moutain Bikes (MTB) / All Terrain Bikes (ATB)

Moutain Bikes sizes are measured:
· Wheel size (Imperial/inches)
· The length of the seat tube – the part of the bike that the seat post slides into down to the centre of the crank wheel. Traditionally this measurement is given in metric (cm).




 
The length of the sit-tube depends on your inseam length as per here-under

 

Road Bikes
The most important considerations to make as you decide which frame to go for is the effective top tube length: the distance from the head tube to the seat post on a bike with a sloping top tube, or simply the length of the top tube on a road bike with traditional geometry. Get the top tube length too long and you'll be overreaching to the handlebars, using a flatter riding position akin to a racing position, which could be uncomfortable on longer rides.
If you're looking for a more comfortable riding position then you may wish to go for a shorter effective top tube length. Use the chart below for a rough guide on the frame size to go for.